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Our Team

The bedrock of a holistic defender office is an interdisciplinary team of passionate advocates committed to addressing each client's most pressing legal and social support needs, and fighting by her side no matter what. Meet the team:

Katherine Baltes
Katherine Baltes
Investigator

Katherine Baltes

Katherine graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 2017, where she studied English and Sociology. While at Notre Dame, she interned as an investigator for the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia and with LifeMoves, an organization that provides transitional housing for families in Menlo Park, California.

Kristen Black
Kristen Black
Social Worker

Kristen Black

Kristen received her MSW from the University of Chicago in 2014. While earning her degree, she interned at the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center and provided literacy tutoring, art therapy and creative writing workshops to young men and women detained in the center. Kristen also worked as a university research assistant, and served as an editorial board member for the social work journal, Advocates’ Forum, at the University of Chicago. Prior to social work school, Kristen earned a master’s degree in women’s and gender studies and focused her research on descriptive policy analysis of gender-responsive policies and programming in criminal detention centers. Most recently, Kristen worked as a social worker in the criminal defense practice at The Bronx Defenders.

Ruth Hamilton
Ruth Hamilton
Attorney

Ruth Hamilton

Ruth received her law degree from Harvard Law School where she was co-chair of the Tenant Advocacy Project, a student practice organization dedicated to representing low-income tenants facing eviction. Ruth received a pro bono service award for dedicating over 1000 hours in law school to free legal representation. During law school, she was also a student attorney in the Criminal Justice Institute and participated in the International Human Rights clinic. Ruth spent her 2L summer at the Neighborhood Justice Center, a nonprofit public defense organization in St. Paul, Minnesota. Before law school, Ruth spent time in Guatemala where she met with women's groups to discuss subjects such as reproductive health. Ruth graduated magna cum laude from Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin. She spent a semester in college working at the Winnebago County Public Defender's Office and a semester at the Federal Defender of Rockford, Illinois. Ruth is proficient in Spanish. Prior to joining Still She Rises, Tulsa, Ruth was a criminal defense attorney at The Bronx Defenders.

Harraah Howard
Harraah Howard
Community Reception Coordinator

Harraah Howard

Harraah Howard is a recent graduate from The University of Illinois, having received her Master’s degree in Immigration: The Citizenship Process. Previously, Harraah worked for Unity for Christ Outreach Ministry, a nonprofit organization in Springfield, Illinois, as an administrative assistant and a community outreach coordinator. For the past 10 years, Harraah has worked as a liaison for international students on and off of campus while advocating for immigrant rights. She is bilingual and furthering her education in Criminal Law to advocate for the rights of immigrants. For her thesis project, she created a unit plan for 5th grade students in Beardstown, Illinois to educate students on the importance of teaching diversity, tolerance, cultural sensitivity, immigration, and bully awareness. Embracing values of integrity, prosperity, human rights, and motivating others to do the right thing, Harraah Howard believes that we do better when we know better.

Patrice James
Patrice James
Attorney

Patrice James

Patrice ("Amber") James graduated from the Salmon P. Chase College of Law at Northern Kentucky University in 2011. While in law school, Amber was the President of the Black Law Students Association and participated in the Thurgood Marshall Mock Trial Competition and practiced in the Indigent Defense Clinic.  Amber spent her first summer of law school as a law clerk in Mas on Municipal Court and her second summer at the Georgia Capital Defenders in Atlanta, Georgia.  Amber graduated from Charleston Southern University in 2007 where she received a full athletic scholarship to play Division I basketball. Prior to joining Still She Rises, Tulsa, Amber was a criminal defense attorney at The Bronx Defenders.

Asher Levinthal
Asher Levinthal
Attorney

Asher Levinthal

Asher received his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where he was the Executive Articles Editor for the Journal of Law and Social Change. At Penn, Asher participated in both the Criminal Defense and Custody and Support Assistance Clinic. Asher spent his 1L summer interning at the Georgia Capital Defenders. During his 2L summer he worked at the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia and The Southern Center for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia. Prior to attending law school, Asher was an organizer for the Obama Campaign and a paralegal at the New York Law Department. Asher graduated from Vassar College, where he majored in Sociology and History. Prior to joining Still She Rises, Tulsa, Asher was a family defense attorney at The Bronx Defenders.

Rachel Maremont
Rachel Maremont
Assistant to the Director

Rachel Maremont

Rachel graduated magna cum laude from Colorado College in 2015, where she studied Sociology and Spanish and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. While at Colorado College, she was an intern at The Bell Policy Center, a progressive research and policy think tank in Denver, CO; the South Texas Pro Bono Asylum Representation Project, which provides legal representation to unaccompanied minors in immigration proceedings; and the Foundation for Sustainable Development in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Her senior thesis, which won departmental honors, focused on the recent increase in child migration from Central America. Rachel speaks Spanish.

Catherine O’Neill
Catherine O’Neill
Advocate

Catherine O’Neill

Catherine graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2017, where she studied English and journalism. While at UNC, she interned with the North Carolina Office for Indigent Defense Services and with the Georgia Innocence Project, an organization dedicated to exonerating the wrongfully convicted in Georgia and Alabama via DNA evidence. While studying in London for a semester, Catherine interned with Rene Cassin, a human rights non-profit focused on advocacy, policy analysis, public campaigning and education. She also has experience conducting research in environmental law and working with private criminal defense attorneys.

Kristina Saleh
Kristina Saleh
Attorney

Kristina Saleh

Kristina graduated from The University of Michigan Law School, where she was a Dean's Public Service Fellow.  During law school, Kristina participated in the Criminal Appellate Clinic and the Michigan Innocence Clinic. While in law school, Kristina interned at the California Appellate Project and the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia.  Kristina also holds a Master's Degree in Social Work from the University of Michigan and interned at the Bronx Defenders and the Center for Forensic Psychiatry as a social worker.  Prior to law school, Kristina worked as a Peace Corps volunteer in Thailand. Prior to joining Still She Rises, Tulsa, Kristina was a criminal defense attorney at The Bronx Defenders.

Robin Steinberg
Robin Steinberg
Executive Director

Robin Steinberg

Robin Steinberg is a leader and a pioneer in the field of indigent defense. Since graduating from the New York University School of Law in 1982, Robin has spent her entire career as a public defender. In 1997, Robin founded The Bronx Defenders, where she helped develop The Bronx Defenders’ model of holistic defense – a client-centered model of public defense that uses interdisciplinary teams of advocates to address both the underlying causes and collateral consequences of criminal justice involvement. Robin has been honored by the National Legal Aid & Defender Association for her “exceptional vision, devotion, and service in the quest for equal justice” and by the New York Bar Association for her “outstanding contributions to the delivery of defense services.” She was awarded Harvard Law School’s Wasserstein Fellowship in recognition of her “outstanding contributions and dedication to public interest law.” Robin created the Externship in Holistic Defense at Columbia Law School and is the author of a number of articles, including “Heeding Gideon’s Call in the 21st Century: Holistic Defense and the New Public Defense Paradigm” (Washington and Lee Law Review, Summer 2013). Robin is the Executive Director of The Bronx Defenders and the project lead for Still She Rises.

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Advisory Board

Our National Advisory Board is a group of innovative and pioneering thought leaders in the field who help to guide and inform our work by providing strategic leadership and vision.

April Frazier Camara
April Frazier Camara

April Frazier Camara

April is the Director of Defender Legal Services Initiatives at the National Legal Aid and Defender Association, which advances NLADA’s goals and priorities through strategic initiatives aimed at enhancing public defense. For the last eight years, April worked as a public defender with the Public Defender Service for D.C. as a Reentry Coordinator, and most recently as the Special Assistant in the Juvenile Defender Unit at the Law Office of the Shelby County Public Defender where she was responsible for implementing Department of Justice reforms and helping to build the first ever holistic and team-based juvenile defense practice in Shelby County that employed both social workers and attorneys.  She also has experience working on national reentry policy reform at the American Bar Association in D.C. and Legal Action Center in NY.  She received a B.A. from Tennessee State University and a J.D. from Howard University.

Anne Coughlin
Anne Coughlin

Anne Coughlin

Anne M. Coughlin is the Lewis F. Powell, Jr., Professor of Law at the University of Virginia. She taught at Vanderbilt Law School from 1991-95, and she joined the University of Virginia faculty in 1996 after visiting during the 1995-96 academic year. Her primary research and teaching interests are in the areas of criminal law, criminal procedure, feminist jurisprudence and law and humanities. She is co-author of a casebook on criminal law, and she has written a number of articles exploring the intersections among criminal law, criminal procedure and feminist theory, as well as essays concerning the connections between law and literature.

In 1999, Coughlin received an All-University Teaching Award, one of the University's highest honors for excellence in teaching, research and service. She is co-chair of the National Association of Women Lawyers Supreme Court Evaluation Committee and of its Amicus Committee. Coughlin received her J.D. from New York University School of Law. At NYU Law School, Coughlin won numerous awards, and she served as managing editor for the New York University Law Review. After graduation, she clerked for Judge Jon O. Newman of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr.

Kimberlé Crenshaw
Kimberlé Crenshaw

Kimberlé Crenshaw

Kimberlé Crenshaw, Professor of Law at UCLA and Columbia Law School, is a leading authority in the area of Civil Rights, Black feminist legal theory, and race, racism and the law.  Her work has been foundational in two fields of study that have come to be known by terms that she coined: Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality. Crenshaw’s  articles have appeared in the Harvard Law Review, National Black Law Journal, Stanford Law Review and Southern California Law Review. She is the founding coordinator of the Critical Race Theory Workshop, and the co-editor of the volume, Critical Race Theory: Key Documents That Shaped the Movement. Crenshaw has lectured widely on race matters, addressing audiences across the country as well as in Europe, India, Africa and South America.

A specialist on race and gender equality, she has facilitated workshops for human rights activists in Brazil and in India, and for constitutional court judges in South Africa. Her groundbreaking work on “Intersectionality” has traveled globally and was influential in the drafting of the equality clause in the South African Constitution. Crenshaw authored the background paper on Race and Gender Discrimination for the United Nation’s World Conference on Racism, served as the Rapporteur for the conference’s Expert Group on Gender and Race Discrimination, and coordinated NGO efforts to ensure the inclusion of gender in the WCAR Conference Declaration. She is a leading voice in calling for a gender-inclusive approach to racial justice interventions, having spearheaded the Why We Can’t Wait Campaign and co-authored Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected, and Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women.

Crenshaw has worked extensively on a variety of issues pertaining to gender and race in the domestic arena including violence against women, structural racial inequality, and affirmative action.  She has served as a member of the National Science Foundation’s committee to research violence against women and has consulted with leading foundations, social justice organizations and corporations to advance their race and gender equity initiatives.

In 1996, she co-founded the African American Policy Forum to house a variety of projects designed to deliver research-based strategies to better advance social inclusion. Among the Forum’s projects are the Affirmative Action Research and Policy Consortium and the Multiracial Literacy and Leadership Initiative.  In partnership with the Aspen Roundtable for Community Change, Crenshaw facilitated workshops on racial equity for hundreds of community leaders and organizations throughout the country.  With the support of the Rockefeller Foundation, Crenshaw facilitates the Bellagio Project, an international network of scholars working in the field of social inclusion from five continents.. She formerly served as Committee Chair for the U.S.-Brazil Joint Action Plan to Promote Racial and Ethnic Equality, an initiative of the U.S. State Department. A founding member of the Women’s Media Initiative, Crenshaw writes for Ms. Magazine, the Nation and other print media, and has appeared as a regular commentator on “The Tavis Smiley Show,” NPR, and MSNBC. Recently, Crenshaw gave a TedTalk on intersectionality and state violence against Black women and Girls. Entitled “The Urgency of Intersectionality,” her talk currently has well over half a million views.

In 2016, Crenshaw received an honorary doctorate degree from John Jay College of Criminal Justice for her gender and racial justice advocacy work. She was also named the 2016 Fellows Outstanding Scholar by the American Bar Foundation. In 2015, Crenshaw was featured in the Ebony Power 100, a list honoring the contemporary heroes of the black community, and was #1 on Ms. Magazine’s list of Feminist Heroes of 2015. She was also honored in March as one of Harvard Law School’s “Women Inspiring Change,” and the same month she was recognized by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education as one of the "Top 25 Women in Higher Education." Twice awarded Professor of the Year at UCLA Law School, Crenshaw received the Lucy Terry Prince Unsung Heroine Award presented by the Lawyers’ Committee on Civil Rights Under Law, and the ACLU Ira Glasser Racial Justice Fellowship from 2005-07.  Crenshaw has received the Fulbright Distinguished Chair for Latin America, the Alphonse Fletcher Fellowship, and was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in 2009 and a Visiting Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy in 2010. Currently, Crenshaw is Director of the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies (CISPS) at Columbia Law School, which she founded in 2011, as well as the Centennial Professor at the LSE Gender Institute 2015-2018.

Jamie Fellner
Jamie Fellner

Jamie Fellner

Jamie Fellner was the first director of the US Program at Human Rights Watch and then served as senior counsel. Through research and advocacy, she has targeted  the  abuse of people caught up in US criminal justice systems,  pressing for reforms that would better respect their internationally recognized human rights. She has worked on a range of problems, including  prison rape, solitary confinement, disproportionately severe prison sentences, race discrimination in drug law enforcement, coercive plea bargaining, and excessive force against persons with mental illness in prison.

Carol Gilligan
Carol Gilligan

Carol Gilligan

Carol Gilligan received an A.B. with highest honors in English literature from Swarthmore College, a master's degree in clinical psychology from Radcliffe College and a Ph.D. in social psychology from Harvard University. Her landmark book In A Different Voice (1982) is described by Harvard University Press as "the little book that started a revolution." Following In A Different Voice, she initiated the Harvard Project on Women's Psychology and Girls' Development and co-authored or edited five books with her students: Mapping the Moral Domain (1988); Making Connections (1990); Women, Girls, and Psychotherapy: Reframing Resistance (1991); Meeting at the Crossroads: Women's Psychology and Girls' Development (1992) -- a New York Times notable book of the year -- and Between Voice and Silence: Women and Girls, Race and Relationships (1995). Her 2002 book The Birth of Pleasure, was described by The Times Literary Supplement as “a thrilling new paradigm.”

She has received a Senior Research Scholar Award from the Spencer Foundation, a Grawemeyer Award for her contributions to education, a Heinz Award for her contributions to understanding the human condition, and was named by Time Magazine in 1996 as one of the 25 most influential Americans. Following her research on women and girls' development, she studied young boys and their parents and explored impasses in man-woman relationships. The Strengthening Healthy Resistance and Courage in Girls programs, the Women Teaching Girls/Girls Teaching Women retreats, and the In Our Own Voices workshops she developed with her colleagues have become model intervention and prevention projects.

She was a member of the Harvard faculty for over 30 years and in 1997 became Harvard's first professor of Gender Studies, occupying the Patricia Albjerg Graham chair. In 1992, she was Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at the University of Cambridge. In 2002, she became University Professor at New York University, with affiliations in the School of Law, the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Suzanne Hooper
Suzanne Hooper

Suzanne Hooper

Suzanne C. Hooper MSW, CSW is a mitigation specialist in private practice in Lexington, KY.   She earned a BA in psychology from New York University and an MSW from The University of Kentucky.

She works on both capital and non-capital cases involving both adult and juvenile defendants, and has a special interest in mining gender specific mitigation themes, often overlooked or even dismissed, that are found in the stories of women clients. She is the lead author and principal investigator of the project Throwaway Moms: Maternal Incarceration and the Criminalization of Female Poverty (Affilia: The Journal of Women and Social Work, April, 2010), which explores mitigation themes unique to women, particularly mothers.  She is also co-author of the chapter entitled Mitigation Practice: Turning Defendants into Persons in the book Tell the Client’s Story: Mitigation in Criminal and Death Penalty Cases (American Bar Association, 2017).

Jennifer Kroman
Jennifer Kroman

Jennifer Kroman

Jennifer Kroman is Cleary Gottlieb’s Director of Pro Bono Practice. She manages the firm’s broad array of pro bono matters and develops and strengthens Cleary’s relationships with public interest and legal services partners. Jennifer leads an award winning pro bono program that serves hundreds of low income individuals and the non-profit organizations that assist them. 

Jennifer maintains an active docket of pro bono cases. She has represented dozens of human trafficking survivors in a wide array of matters, including filing post-conviction motions to vacate criminal convictions, immigration relief and civil damages claims. She has been honored for this work by The Legal Aid Society and Sanctuary For Families, and as a “Lawyer who Leads By Example,” by The New York Law Journal.  She has also represented numerous survivors of domestic violence, forced marriage and honor killings in securing immigration relief.  Most recently, Jennifer spearheaded Cleary’s pro bono efforts in responding to the 2017 immigration executive orders, including leading the pro bono team that secured the return of Dr. Suha Abushamma, a Cleveland Clinic doctor wrongfully returned to Saudi Arabia from JFK airport on January 28, 2017. 

Previously Jennifer was a litigation partner and associate at Cleary Gottlieb.  She is an active board member of Association of Pro Bono Counsel and Sanctuary For Families, and is a frequent speaker on representing victims of human trafficking and ethical issues in pro bono representation.

Janet Levit
Janet Levit

Janet Levit

Janet K. Levit earned her J.D. in 1994 from the Yale Law School where she was book reviews and articles editor of the Yale Journal of International Law. She earned a M.A. in International Relations in 1994 from Yale University and an A.B., magna cum laude, in 1990 from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University (with a concentration in Latin American Studies). She served as law clerk for Stephanie K. Seymour, Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, and for the Chair of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States. She has argued cases before the before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, as well as the Tenth Circuit. Professor Levit practiced in the international trade and finance areas at the Export-Import Bank of the United States, as well as in the private sector. She has also completed internships at the U.S. Embassy in Brazil and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Professor Levit writes about international finance and international human rights issues and published her most recent articles in the Emory Law Journal, Yale Journal of International Law, Harvard International Law Journal, and the Columbia Journal of Transnational Law. Her teaching interests include international law, international commercial law, international human rights, contracts and administrative law. Professor Levit was director of the College of Law’s inaugural Summer Institute in International Law in Buenos Aires, Argentina and was a visiting professor at Vanderbilt Law School during the spring 2007 term. In October 2007, the President of the University of Tulsa appointed Professor Levit as Interim Dean of the College of Law, and on July 10, 2008, she was appointed Dean of the College of Law and served as Dean of the College of Law from 2008 to 2015.

Alysia Reiner
Alysia Reiner

Alysia Reiner

Alysia is best known for her role as Natalie "Fig" Figueroa, the tough as nails assistant warden everyone loves to hate on Netflix's hit series Orange is the New Black. Alysia won a SAG award as part of the amazing ensemble cast, and you can see her in all 5 seasons. She is now filming season 2 as Sunny in the new Louie CK/Pamela Adlon Peabody Award winner and critical fav Better Things, and you can also see her this coming season on Broad City, Odd Mom Out, as D.A. Parks in How to Get Away with Murder, & Fiona in Search Party.

On the film front, Alysia stars in Equity, the first ever female driven Wall Street film, which she also produced. The film premiered at Sundance, was acquired by Sony Pictures Classics, was in theaters nationwide, and is now on demand & iTunes, and Alysia won a WIN award for her work in it. EQUITY was Alysia's first feature as both actress and producer, but has acted in critically acclaimed & award winning films & TV; over 50 episodes of television and over 30 features, working with masters from Alexander Payne in the Oscar winning SIDEWAYS to Jodie Foster. Alysia loves working as a changemaker for women, and has been invited to the White House, the United Nations, S.H.E. Summit, Google, and Cannes Lion to speak about breaking barriers for women in all fields. Additionally, she was awarded the Persistence of Vision Award by the Women's Media Summit, the Sarah Powell Huntington Leadership Award by the Women's Prison Association, and just in this past year she has been honored with the Voice of a Woman Award, the Moves Power Woman Award, the Pioneer in Filmmaking Award, and the Founders Award for Support.

Dorothy Roberts
Dorothy Roberts

Dorothy Roberts

Dorothy Roberts is the 14th Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor and George A. Weiss University Professor of Law & Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, with joint appointments in the Departments of Africana Studies and Sociology and the Law School, where she is the inaugural Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights. She is also the founding director of the Penn Program on Race, Science & Society. An internationally recognized scholar, public intellectual, and social justice advocate, she has written and lectured extensively on the interplay of gender, race, and class in urgent legal and policy issues and has been a leader in transforming thinking on reproductive justice, child welfare, and bioethics. Professor Roberts is the author of Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (Random House/Pantheon, 1997; Vintage 20th Anniversary Edition, 2017), Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare (Basic Books/Civitas, 2002), Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-First Century (New Press, 2011), and more than 100 articles and essays in books and scholarly journals, as well as co-editor of six books on constitutional law and gender. Roberts has served on the boards of directors of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the Black Women’s Health Imperative, and the National Coalition for Child Protection Reform, on the advisory boards of the Center for Genetics and Society, Family Defense Center, Still She Rises, and on the Standards Working Group of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Recent recognitions of her scholarship and public service include Columbia’s 2017 Mamie Phipps Clark and Kenneth B. Clark Distinguished Lecture Award, Society of Family Planning 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award, Harvard University 2016 Tanner Lectures on Human Values, American Psychiatric Association 2015 Solomon Carter Fuller Award, and American Council of Learned Societies 2015-2016 Fellowship.

Abbe Smith
Abbe Smith

Abbe Smith

Abbe Smith is Director of the Criminal Defense and Prisoner Advocacy Clinic, Co-Director of the E. Barrett Prettyman Fellowship Program, and Professor of Law at Georgetown University. Prior to coming to Georgetown, Professor Smith was Deputy Director of the Criminal Justice Institute, Clinical Instructor, and Lecturer at Law at Harvard Law School. She has also taught at the City University New York School of Law, Temple University School of Law, American University Washington College of Law, and the University of Melbourne Law School (Australia), where she was a Senior Fulbright Scholar. Professor Smith teaches and writes on criminal defense, juvenile justice, legal ethics, and clinical legal education. In addition to numerous law journal articles, she is the author of Case of a Lifetime: A Criminal Defense Lawyer’s Story (2008), co-editor with Monroe Freedman of How Can You Represent Those People? (2013), co-author with Monroe Freedman of Understanding Lawyers’ Ethics (5th ed., 2016), and co-editor with Alice Woolley and Monroe Freedman of Lawyers’ Ethics (2017). Her newest book-in-progress is called Guilty People. Professor Smith began her legal career at the Defender Association of Philadelphia, where she was an Assistant Defender, member of the Special Defense Unit, and Senior Trial Attorney from 1982 to 1990. She continues to be actively engaged in indigent criminal defense as both a clinical supervisor and member of the Criminal Justice Act panel for the DC Superior Court, and frequently presents at public defender, capital defender, and other lawyer training programs in the United States and abroad. Professor Smith is a member of the Board of Directors of The Bronx Defenders, Still She Rises, and the Monroe H. Freedman Institute for the Study of Legal Ethics, a member of the Faculty Advisory Board of the Georgetown Prisons and Justice Initiative, an Adviser to the American Law Institute’s Project to Reform the Model Penal Code’s Provisions on Sexual Assault and Related Offenses, and a longtime member of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, American Civil Liberties Union, and National Lawyers Guild. In 2010, she was elected to the American Board of Criminal Lawyers. In 2016, Professor Smith received Georgetown’s Frank F. Flegal Excellence in Teaching Award. Professor Smith is also a published cartoonist. A collection of her cartoons, Carried Away: The Chronicles of a Feminist Cartoonist, was published by Sanguinaria Publishing, Inc. in 1984.

Brenda Smith
Brenda Smith

Brenda Smith

Brenda V. Smith is a professor at the American University Washington College of Law where she is the Co-Director of the Community Economic Development Law Clinic.  Professor Smith is also the Project Director for the United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Corrections Cooperative Agreement on Addressing Prison Rape.  In 1993, Professor Smith was awarded the Kellogg National Leadership Fellowship and, in 1998, inducted into the D.C. Women’s Hall of Fame for her work on behalf of low-income women and children.  In November 2003, Professor Smith was appointed to the National Prison Rape Elimination Commission by the United States House of Representatives Minority Leader, Nancy Pelosi (D-CA).  Prior to Professor Smith’s faculty appointment at the Washington College of Law, she was the Senior Counsel for Economic Security at the National Women's Law Center and Director of the Center's Women in Prison Project and Child and Family Support Project from 1988 to 1998.  Professor Smith is a 1984 graduate of Georgetown University Law Center and 1980 a magna cum laude graduate of Spelman College.

 

Professor Smith’s scholarly work and writing focuses on the intersections of gender, crime and sexuality. She is widely published and has received the Emmalee C. Godsey Research Award and Pauline Ruyle Moore Award for her scholarship. Publications include Battering, Forgiveness and Redemption, 12 Am.U. J.  Gender Soc. Pl’y & L. 1, 921 (2003); Rethinking Prison Sex: Self -Expression and Safety, Symposium on Sexuality and the Law, 15 Colum. J. Gender & L. 185 (2006); Sexual Abuse of Women in Prison: A Modern Corollary of Slavery, 33 Fordham Urb. L.J.  571 (2006) Uncomfortable Places, Close Spaces: Theorizing Female Correctional Officers’ Sexual Interactions with Men and Boys in Custody, 59 U.C.L.A. L. Rev. 1690 (2012); Boys, Rape and Masculinity, Reclaiming Male Narrative of Sexual Violence in Custody, 29 N.C.L. Rev. 1559 (2015); and Stories of Teaching Race, Gender, and Class: A Narrative, 51 Wash. U. J. L. & Pol’y 011 (2016). Recent speaking engagements include the 2016 McClure Lecture at the University of Mississippi and the Convening on Women and Girls in the Criminal Justice System in June, 2016 at the White House.  

Summer 2017 Interns

We are thrilled to welcome our Summer 2017 Intern Class coming to us from University of Tulsa, Berkeley, Georgetown, NYU, and Harvard.

Summer 2017 Interns
Michael Lando, Emma Vasta-Kuby, Nia Holsten, Maryam Adamu, Aubrey Rose, and Abi Pink. (Not pictured: Edie Joseph)